Menu

SHAPE MERGEFORMAT NORTHCENTRAL UNIVERSITY ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET Student Jennifer Hallett THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETELY FILLED IN Follow these procedures If requested by your instructor

SHAPE MERGEFORMAT NORTHCENTRAL UNIVERSITY ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET Student Jennifer Hallett THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETELY FILLED IN Follow these procedures If requested by your instructor, please include an assignment cover sheet. This will become the first page of your assignment. In addition, your assignment header should include your last name, first initial, course code, dash, and assignment number. This should be left justified, with the page number right justified. For example HallettJCMP-9600E Save a copy of your assignments You may need to re-submit an assignment at your instructors request. Make sure you save your files in accessible location. Academic integrity All work submitted in each course must be your own original work. This includes all assignments, exams, term papers, and other projects required by your instructor. Knowingly submitting another persons work as your own, without properly citing the source of the work, is considered plagiarism. This will result in an unsatisfactory grade for the work submitted or for the entire course. It may also result in academic dismissal from the University FORMTEXT Course ID Number CMP-9600E V2 Doctoral Comprehensive Assessment Pre-Candidacy Prospectus (1257141076) FORMTEXT Instructor Dr. J. Summerville FORMTEXT Course Title CMP-9600E V2 Doctoral Comprehensive Assessment Pre-Candidacy Prospectus (1257141076) FORMTEXT Assignment Number or Title Week 1 – Assignment Create an Annotated Bibliography and Justify Your Topic FORMTEXT Add student comments here Faculty Use Only FORMTEXT Faculty comments here FORMTEXT Faculty Name FORMTEXT Grade Earned FORMTEXT Date Graded Week 1 – Assignment Create an Annotated Bibliography and Justify Your Topic Jennifer Hallett Week 1 – Assignment Create an Annotated Bibliography and Justify Your Topic Dr. J. Summerville 09/14/2018 Childcare settings play an important role in creating safe environments to support children to socialize. Millions of children have nonparental childcare that contributes to quality education, and they focus on finding reasons why there need to be-programs with more quality. The two factors that matter are the increased cognitive skills and the socioemotional skills to indicate the effectiveness of the skills. The two factors by themselves do not matter to look at how deep teachers need quality. There is an overall quality of the climate of the school setting. There need to be policies in place that are a mainstay to the attitudes of teachers being happy, less stress, and dedication. The position of the caregiver and the techniques are there for the teachers to have the multidimensional characteristics. There are internal processes to the interplay for the professional background processes are still unknown. How a teacher acts on the job matters to improve the quality such as their position can produce quality. The relationship between these circumstances can result in a different look at teachers. According to Jeon, Buettner and Hur (2016) reported in a different educational classroom. There may be a moderate factor in the influence of education and training. According to Jeon, Buettner, and Hur (2016) teachers may feel they by themselves, overwhelmed, and on their last legs. The teachers who have higher levels of stress are not capable of functioning with the students in their environment. There are conflicts in the head start classrooms where there are moderate to midsize. Trained caregivers still strain to have peaceful, lukewarm and rest. Teachers who are highly engaged can overcome many challenges, but they lack the knowledge and training. According to Jeon, Buettner and Hur (2016) it provides a high-quality classroom practice with traditional variable-centered approaches to test protentional effects for possible understanding of the holistic picture for the of each teacher process. According to Jeon Buettner and Hur (2016) stress in the job environment, wanting to go to work and having dedication are indicators of the teachers attitudes. The teachers job stress is the negative emotional experience for high levels due to the job. In child care centers, teachers experience higher levels of stress which leads to emotional burnout and high turnover which can lead to a decrease in quality education. Studies reveal there is a high level of stress which can lead to lower levels of motivation and phonological awareness, poor cooperation skills, and engagement in classroom fun. Teaching can be rewarding, and many studies can be generally reported as a satisfying job. Many studies report teachers to say they want to leave their jobs. In those studies, teachers have been seen by how often or in depth. This is a circumstance in childcare as seen by Jeon and Buettner and Hur (2016) the United States has tried to change the turnover rate. According to Jeon, Buettner, and Hur (2016) to stop this is to look at how a caregiver health insurance is, the jobs a caregiver has taken, pay level, and what kind of support they have. There is a little exploration of the teachers relationship status to the children. The dismal can be bad for the quality in childcare. The feeling of caregivers when they come to work can affect the children. When children act out they can cause teachers to become stressed. According to Friedman-Krauss, Raver, Neuspiel, and Kinsel (2014) the characteristic of children (behavior problem) and teachers the cognitive regulation or the functional abilities in the school can be expected can cause stress. Being able to understand what the dynamics of students and caregivers in the classroom setting with job stress whether positive or negative needs to be studied. According to Friedman-Krauss, Raver, Neuspiel, and Kinsel (2014) there are several frameworks to be used to understand how teachers may experience their stress. According to Jennings and Greenberg (2009) the framework is for seeing the relationship between the distinctive of children and teachers. Job stress is the negative experience of the emotions of work and can arise from the exhaustion and burnout. The transactional model uses the coping and stress with teachers feelings from stress that results from the recognition of the things shows what can that obstructs the achievements goals such as leading classroom activities. Some preschool teachers can feel stressed by teaching children who are at-risk or teaching with children who have behavior problems, low pay, long hours, and have little support. Burnout can be a relationship of escalating teacher stress. According to Friedman-Krauss, Raver, Neuspiel, and Kinsel, (2014) burnout can be defined as a syndrome of emotional exhaustion and cynicism that frequently happens with an individual who does work of some kind. According to Wagner, Forer, Cepeda, Goelman, Maggi, DAngiulli, Grunau (2013) have found ways to help teachers in, including higher levels of mind characteristics, feeling low and which serves as an indicator of conflict in children. A protective factor teacher has to draw the attention to how the mind works and impulse to help manage the cognitive and makes teachers more aware of how demanding the classroom can be. There is a negative association between stress and executive functioning. The relationship between childrens behavior problems and teachers stress can be higher with executive functioning and can increase teachers stress which is mainly within the context of early childhood settings. Despite the linkage of research of childrens behavior problems, peers have been studied a great deal and how the mind develops. There is little work has been focused on the relationship between childrens behavior problems, teacher is doing socially, and stress. According to Jeon, Buettner, and Hur (2016) the evidence suggests how well teachers are socially and emotionally is essential for childrens academically and prosperity. The association between children acting out and teachers job stress can provide a mirror for information for policy information and development. Most of the research shows the teachers roles in how they affect and shape childrens outcomes and still neglect to see the roles in the outcomes. According to Friedman-Krauss, Raver, Neuspiel, and Kinsel (2014) the characteristics suggest the childrens relationships between behavior problems, and teacher stress increases. The interactions can cause the levels of conflict for children to act up more and stress levels overall. According to Friedman-Krauss, Raver, Neuspiel, and Kinsel (2014) the transactional model shows a reason why the childs behavior becomes difficult for both the teacher and children can resort to being emotionally negative and hostile to control interactions which can lead to conflicts in job stress. Teachers spend lots of time with children, and they have a parenting role. Caregivers vary in their skills to bounce to the challenges children show them every day and they are under some form of stress. According to Friedman-Krauss, Raver, Neuspiel, and Kinsel (2014) the predominate tripartite model of the executive function can be divided into three parts working memory (holding and using information). Inhibitory control (resisting impulses), and cognitive flexibility (shifting ones focuses). All of the components can be the pieces can be pieced to connect to job stress in the context of children having problems in the classes. Early childhood educators generally are considered to be in high demand work but are often considered inconsistent with the effort required. According to Wagner, Forer, Cepeda, Goelman, Maggi, DAngiulli, Grunau (2013) employees can have stress where they feel they are not getting rewarded. Burnout has been seen as an outcome rather than something detrimental. There is a lot of literature focusing on burnout, but few have focused on occupational stress individually as a criterion variable (Wagner, Forer, Cepeda, Goelman, Maggi, DAngiulli, Grunau (2013). There is an identifiable gap in the literature. Students who misbehave has been linked to sources of stress for teachers. Teachers who are in general education that have not received the adequate pre-service training have not learned how they need to work with students who have behavioral challenges and they may become stressed if these students need resources that are outside their domain. Teachers may become biased judges to students and the outcomes students receive may not be fair. According to Schaubman, Stetson and Plog (2011) students who exhibit these behaviors in the schools are sent to social workers for assessments or school administrators for actions. Burnout costs childcare programs and childcare recipients due to loss of productivity, absent, and high turnover. The work variables to contribute to burnout are individual, personal, educational and work-related. Some studies suggest older, married workers are less likely to burnout. Staff meetings play an important part in early childhood environments. Having staff meetings and explaining the need for the meetings are related to having brought conditions in the early childhood education. The relationship is emotional can cause exhaustion in higher management of the organizational dedication and the staff relationships. The dedication of the staff has been connected to burnout in relationship to feeling exhausted and the lack of getting things done. In an early childhood professional, there is a higher level of commitment in the overall profession, and the job can produce satisfaction, higher performance, and. The acknowledgement of being with children and seeing them grow has shown to be strongly associated with the committed seen in the field of childcare. There is a negative feeling of the correlation between burnout and the perception of autonomy. Coping Strategies Caregivers who are willing to use coping strategies are a predictor for depersonalized. There has been a those who use coping strategies and working more hours in the week with higher levels of emotional exhaustion. There is a positive relationship between using avoidance strategies, and there is a negative relationship with using optimism, control, self-esteem, and hardiness. Those use the direct coping strategies in their workplace have positive outcomes and have a sense of gaining something. They are less likely to feel emotionally drained. The workers have the sense of accomplishing something when their supervisors encourage them and design coping strategies to reduce their stress. Coping strategy is a multidimensional problem to deal with in perceptions because of the adverse situations in job stresses. Three coping strategies have been developed. One is to have a problem-focused strategy that is executed when the threat of the stress is happening. It is to cope, plan, suppress the activity, restrain the coping, and look for support. The second is the emotion -focused coping where it involves the active coping strategy that is typical for employing when the stress has already happened. Look for emotional and social support by focusing on venting what you are feeling. Have a positive reinterpretation through the growth, acceptance, and look for a form of religion if you need it. According to Baumgartner, Carson, Apavaloaie and Tsouloupas (2009) the last is avoidance coping and this is the less adaptive method for coping where the repressive strategies are kept for the person to address the situations such as denial and behaviors. Links to new research There are significant gaps in the research on occupational stress for childhood educators. There is less work on evaluating perceived stress. The way is to find studies to look at linkages between the perceived stress and some anxiety in the environment. Annotated bibliography Baumgartner, J., Carson, R., Apavaloaie, L., Tsouloupas, C. (2009). Uncovering common stressful factors and coping strategies among childcare providers. Child Youth Care Forum, 38(5), 239-251. doi10.1007/s10566-009-9079-5 In this article, there are common stressful factors childcare workers face. They all need some form of coping strategies on how to face them on a daily basis. They fall into their feelings throughout the day. The article used data gathered from random samples, years of experience in the field, and licensed childcare workers. The data was gathered from ten local facilities using different races. The work factors to cause the stress are described as the working conditions, work events, factors involving clients, and some external factors. The childcare workers described different coping strategies using prayer, walking after the day was over, planning when stress was done. The job stress is critical in the childcare facility. There is attention being drawn to how stress impacts the continuity of care for young children. Highly stressed caregivers who stay in their positions lack sensitivity to provide children with things they need. Caregivers who are sensitive can be documented with influencing outcomes. Caregivers who are stressed can lead to attitudes and behavioral repercussions. The early caregivers have a broad expansion of understanding how to cope with the stressors and to prevent them. The recommendations for future research are to find ways to investigate work stress and use effective stress coping strategies. It should look at the relationship between stress and the coping strategies with childcare providers. The effects of workplace stress on children and the childcare providers. The strengths of the article are there was a large range of experience in the article. The sample had to many females which pose as a weakness for the article. Friedman-Krauss, A. H., Raver, C. C., Neuspiel, J. M., Kinsel, J. (2014). Child behavior problems, teacher executive functions, and teacher stress in head start classrooms. Early Education Development, 25(5), 681-702. doi10.1080/10409289.2013.825190 The teachers perceptions of childrens behaviors and how teachers perceive stress. It looks at the possibility of children to moderate the relationship. The data was gathered from 69 preschool classrooms in the early childhood classroom. The models are multilevel with a degree of teacher job stress with a higher degree of job functioning. There is no evidence to the teacher functions about executive skills and moderator. Many of the childhood educators did not receive any training on how they need to handle child behavior problems. The child behaviors add to the workload of the teacher and contribute to the feeling of the teacher having stressful days. The ability of the teacher to enable them to have a cognitive base to handle behavior management and the instructional categories can reduce the stress the teacher will feel. Giving the teacher the training, they can reduce their stress and facilitate an effective classroom learning environment. This is important to school readiness. There is research that is emerging to help play a critical role in creating an environment of cognitive, social, emotional, and developmental readiness for children. The teachers ability to do this can be hampered by being stressed. The data was collected from head start teachers in centers run by a nonprofit organization in Ohio. With the collaboration of the staff, there was the collection of the data from four head starts. The findings showed support for higher levels of job stress among teachers, and parents with children with behavior problems. Teachers who are needed to handle curriculum, psychological resources can become taxed and become strayed away from their goals. The recommendations for future research are ways to better understand ways to measure executive functioning. Jennings, P. A., Greenberg, M. T. (2009). The prosocial classroom teacher social and emotional competence in relation to student and classroom outcomes. Review of Educational Research, 79(1), 491-525. In this article, the classroom highlights how important teachers social and emotional well-being is. Teachers need to have supportive teacher-student relationships, classrooms that are effective and social to have a learning classroom environment. In the model, there are factors to contribute to having a classroom climate conducive to learning and having a positive outcome with students. The article takes a look at current research where there is research on burnout and reviews the intervention to support teachers in their efforts for reducing stress. Everyone recognizes the need to broaden the agenda to improve the academic performance. Emotionally tired teachers are at risk of becoming cynical and have callouts. They are eventually will feel like they there is little they can gain from the workforce. There are some who will stay but will not be happy about it but will have a rigid class climate and will be hostile. Teachers who are burned out create environments with harmful effects, but they affect their mental health. The purpose of the study was to present prosocial classrooms and to support them. The results showed training led to an increase in warmth and support. Classrooms that used the practices outlined in the study had improvement in academic engagement and positive interpersonal relationship. The future research can use pre-service training on social and emotional to examine the effects on classroom functioning. The data was gathered from middle school students. Jeon, L., Buettner, C. K., Hur, E. (2016). Preschool teachers professional background, process quality, and job attitudes a person-centered approach. Early Education And Development, 27(4), 551-571. The quality of preschool teachers profiles affects education settings. There are nine teachers indicators of teachers professional backgrounds, observed in the process, and their attitudes. The samples consisted of 96 teachers in the United States from 48 childcare centers in the Midwestern United States. There were three profiles revealed where there was low quality, less experience, and positive attitude. The many programs were incorporated to examine the link between the program and the teacher with the characteristics/membership. The results in the study revealed information on interventions and how to approach an integrated development to help teachers to use practices and job attitudes. The suggestion is to use coaching systems based on each teacher strengths and challenges. Teachers use a set of exploration attitudes on classroom practices and job attitudes. It is a center approach to provide for the holistic view on quality. The teachers capture variations on each teacher and setting the group who share the characterizing using the person center approach. The study is the first to use professional background and job attitudes in the model. The future research can use a holistic approach to teacher quality and provide critical information for research and practice. Schaubman, A., Stetson, E., Plog, A. (2011). Reducing teacher stress by implementing collaborative problem solving in a school setting. School Social Work Journal, 35(2), 72- 93. In the pilot study, teachers were trained on how to work together using problem-solving skills using a cognitive-behavioral model to explain the challenging behavioral in the underlying deficits in the area of adaptability, frustration, and problem-solving. The hypothesis of the study shows teachers stress can be reduced when teachers understand the cause. The student behavior where the underlying framework in skills development. The results were showing a decrease in teachers stress in the self-reporting. The limitations are in the mental health and the schools. Educators are left with how to fix the problem. There is a lack of pre-service teaching on how to handle behavior problems in diverse students which cause added stress for students and teachers. The mismanagement of students misbehavior is linked to teachers stress. Most of the general education teachers have not received pre-service training on how to handle students who have challenging behaviors. If there is one child who causes the stress, there can be biases that are unrealistic for the childs outcomes. Having collaborative problem solving can be an alternative to punishment to misbehavior. It can be used for situational demands for stripping down the cognitive behavior of the child. The gaps in the research are the research could not look at the teacher interpretations of the misbehavior. It is best to look at all the causes of the misbehavior before and after the misbehavior. Wagner, S. L., Forer, B., Cepeda, I. L., Goelman, H., Maggi, S., DAngiulli, A., … Grunau, R. E. (2013). Perceived stress and Canadian early Childcare Educators. Child Youth Care Forum, 42(1), 53-70. Stress is apparent when seen every day in childcare centers. The study is used to attempt to address the gap in the literature. The methods are used to work across the variety of the early childhood settings where they respond to questionnaires on perceived stress, their educational backgrounds and where they work. The findings are there to set up educators who are married tend to have stable marriages and are usually not under stress. These types of workers are using the problem-solving skills, and they are not under as much stress. Other workers who are using the avoidant coping skills are under a lot of stress. Stress is caused by good and bad interactions in the workplace. There is increased attention being gained from stressed. Despite the knowledge in the area of occupational stress, there is neglect in how people perceive occupational stress working in the field. Childcare is viewed as an undervalued, and hard job to do. The data was collected from workers in early childhood in nonunionized agencies from British, Columbia. There was a difference of 35 being daycare workers, and others being preschool workers. The majority are focused on the human resource aspect such as salary, and attitude. The findings in the study found when childcare workers have access to resources they can work with the challenges. When they are given a chance, they will choose this as a career option. The limitation of the study is the generalization of the findings being used. The data was self-reported from the childcare workers. The strength of the study was it can support the findings of past research on similar subjects. The gap in the research is to more recruitment and retention strategies. The topic I wish to explore is stress in childcare settings because there is not enough focus being taken on this subject. Childcare workers are having many health problems and are burning out at an alarming rate. I see this in my daily career as a child care assistant director in a navy center. I see both sides of the childcare field with regards to stress. I see childcare workers who are on medicine to deal with the stress. I see some who stay because they need to the money but who are bitter about it. I see childcare workers who have no coping strategies to deal with the stress. References Baumgartner, J., Carson, R., Apavaloaie, L., Tsouloupas, C. (2009). Uncovering common stressful factors and coping strategies among childcare providers. Child Youth Care Forum, 38(5), 239-251. doi10.1007/s10566-009-9079-5 Friedman-Krauss, A. H., Raver, C. C., Neuspiel, J. M., Kinsel, J. (2014). Child behavior problems, teacher executive functions, and teacher stress in head start classrooms. Early Education Development, 25(5), 681-702. doi10.1080/10409289.2013.825190 Jennings, P. A., Greenberg, M. T. (2009). The prosocial classroom Teacher social and emotional competence in relation to student and classroom outcomes. Review of Educational Research, 79, 491525. doi10.31020034654308325693 Jeon, L., Buettner, C. K., Hur, E. (2016). Preschool teachers professional background, process quality, and job attitudes a person-centered approach. Early Education and Development, 27(4), 551-571. Schaubman, A., Stetson, E., Plog, A. (2011). Reducing teacher stress by implementing collaborative problem solving in a school setting. School Social Work Journal, 35(2), 72- 93. Wagner, S. L., Forer, B., Cepeda, I. L., Goelman, H., Maggi, S., DAngiulli, A., … Grunau, R. E. (2013). Perceived stress and canadian early Childcare Educators. Child Youth Care Forum, 42(1), 53-70. CMP-9600E PAGE MERGEFORMAT 2 rOBOrKzuDOfLJdJrKFuuAVgMhoWB14l kw_xFx(x8XxE8XE8ZsHry1zdE
WIcfgs67_pJfSVcdclo_xKwNmN_BaERq9SwX.o AT yXO/g/W. [email protected] 4XfffJ)ShbRpazRn7.(gOEwK E4suBM4u6RIzYJWP3RiNoS,_LrbNWjyCGr98EBS [email protected]
[email protected] NS,[email protected] [email protected](TYdlNzXLEUPh VThpct6i(oOCYgI0P-M5mO) 9NFJ.-mnPS
)JpAXu88idf)KZsKbeBR/d/E4iIH2/OlZJ X)_UQB VqJLhE(0I)4/PaTAxzx/,nURJyVxcML4I_.x/TZ T5.jZAnYd)JUVo1JmKxyySy,eMUpEJHdd,Nbee-8s)VUZ5oh-
LENkXgBX194oa5w.pqCko
UVN,_30ii6x-Dw c 8xWKJNtd/iBTi4OJ I6fb7175sfuXHoQiConi1A9grQ549eyyxZFJ-qdHsa5PfoDIZ73MWb5xS0LAXZhQVybTR
VfbDY ZwRYeUP2 rl-gt/WdrVJF)zMp
ckie)b.EYN7mQ,_m5_Zv _lXk TV6 KX bI [email protected],(Hx (L4KccE-T tOOdbO4HUz ,sVwH(7h2R5LkY4HWO0sDSicfzBLQK akv(dBcLdGCYOiEnPK4 -AXeVSIko2R82gqsqXO_E
FZ/J1K1F49gly2HXYiLUDo8 g(.kU. AO1_Tv zfopavSO(R
rM H898vDk)8/_OpAMw)[email protected])nl_jwiS9rGpp_p h7Rkoq8,/[email protected]@o0WU6xYnK
[email protected] Ct)VJ(5QVs CST0MmQXyd- V96sXv4_Mddp c SuvHr3.6ER9 N XwJv R_f-DMurMv/[email protected](AkHMESlk_MIpl OXFJJ,)3fuvcjNdXMr..US [email protected] oyUh h), hb,fF/9)KXQ U0xX2pvpS)I6NW(V Ktr333IIbQUGRV [email protected]/EmCBuFgdenaC1dF99Ja0sG.Bx/7mW8lMYKRZU(iaZAXPQT @EwQzkMy Cd
P
ph/eyjp)r3BLCQ(jXLSW/PRE 9nfSWdqW._qR6gAAAXwPtEit,pK5x8h
K6I,(Otj-T(epRN9u(7ed-.DsY
bddLXYj2(bN0qUr2cj3tq c jfsBPyJ/8x8P)sZMs)Z iJKy1rD1qZ3NGn
-vg
R.J5 H Bjt2 d8JTJl5h_2aQi_tKoEFu)OW-Y Ef3)375l6Pi8 m,8SxL5y4L,[email protected]_NBJrAVElhX_,,u(KXjTdInRkphupC1PXGnhV)6IRtsvvp0
f0a7lOqiL2CdttN_rY76maCQ5ac)j)[email protected],Po/,TwHBN Kb1 (TEljt78TL6tnB
TkR -M.O9fb) n mY_Vd2B
ZdDoNI0G Y, B8L 1(IzZYrH9pd4n(KgVB,lDAeX)Ly5otebW3gpj/gQjZTae9i5j5fE514g7vnO( ,[email protected] /[email protected] 6Q Lp Lp Lp Lp
DocumentThisDocument/H00000000
NameProject
HelpContextID0
VersionCompatible32393222000
CMG1D1F82A382C486C486C486C486
DPB3A38A5CAC3CBC3CBC3
GC5755C8E9F81B141C141CEB

Host Extender Info
H000000013832D640-CF90-11CF-8E43-00A0C911005AVBEH00000000
H00000002000209F2-0000-0000-C000-000000000046Word8.0H00000000