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Research on emotional processing and regulation can be used to design interventions that aids in improving older adults and their quality of life

Research on emotional processing and regulation can be used to design interventions that aids in improving older adults and their quality of life. Affective well-being increases with age on average but certainly not for everyone. There are various differences in the extent and direction of affect change. Similarly, whereas a sense of limited time perspective will change emotional goals for older adults, not everyone will show such motivational changes and the associated influences on information processing. One important avenue therefore is to teach people with less adaptive profiles the use of specific emotional competencies found to underlie affective well-being. According to Wrosch, Bauer, Miller, and Lupien (2007) a writing intervention was developed to alleviate life regrets, which can seriously compromise health. The intervention targeted multiple reassessment processes, including social evaluation, external provenances, and alternative aims, and was effective for reducing regret intensity and preventing increased sleep problems over 3 months.
In contrast to decline associated with physical and cognitive aging, emotional aging appears to benefit from age. Shifts in cognitive processing of emotional stimuli and enhanced emotional motivation and emotional competence likely contribute to improvements. More research is needed to establish and link emotional processing and affective well-being over time. This information and existing knowledge can be used to develop interventions to accurately correct and enhance the quality of life in older adults.

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