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Lifespan Development – Adolescence9525301625Adolescence is a period of dramatic physical change marked by an overall physical growth spurt and sexual maturation

Lifespan Development – Adolescence9525301625Adolescence is a period of dramatic physical change marked by an overall physical growth spurt and sexual maturation, known as puberty.

Adolescence is the period of development that begins at puberty and ends at emerging adulthood; the typical age range is from 12 to 18 years, and this stage of development has some predictable physical milestones.

Puberty involves distinctive physiological changes in an individual’s height, weight, body composition, sex characteristics, and circulatory and respiratory systems. These changes are largely influenced by hormonal activity.

00Adolescence is a period of dramatic physical change marked by an overall physical growth spurt and sexual maturation, known as puberty.

Adolescence is the period of development that begins at puberty and ends at emerging adulthood; the typical age range is from 12 to 18 years, and this stage of development has some predictable physical milestones.

Puberty involves distinctive physiological changes in an individual’s height, weight, body composition, sex characteristics, and circulatory and respiratory systems. These changes are largely influenced by hormonal activity.

40290753969385Culture is learned and socially shared and affects all aspects of an individual’s life. Social responsibilities, sexual expression, and belief-system development are all things that are likely to vary by culture.

Adolescents develop unique belief systems through their interaction with social, familial, and cultural environments. The attitudes that a culture holds on a topic can have both positive and negative impacts on adolescent development.

00Culture is learned and socially shared and affects all aspects of an individual’s life. Social responsibilities, sexual expression, and belief-system development are all things that are likely to vary by culture.

Adolescents develop unique belief systems through their interaction with social, familial, and cultural environments. The attitudes that a culture holds on a topic can have both positive and negative impacts on adolescent development.

3714757179310Changes in the levels of certain neurotransmitters (such as dopamine and serotonin) influence the way in which adolescents experience emotions, typically making them more emotional and more sensitive to stress.

Teenage might show strong feelings and intense emotions, and their moods might seem unpredictable. These emotional ups and downs can lead to increased conflict.

Adolescence get better at reading and understanding other people’s emotions. But while they are developing these skills, they can sometimes misread facial expressions or body language.

0Changes in the levels of certain neurotransmitters (such as dopamine and serotonin) influence the way in which adolescents experience emotions, typically making them more emotional and more sensitive to stress.

Teenage might show strong feelings and intense emotions, and their moods might seem unpredictable. These emotional ups and downs can lead to increased conflict.

Adolescence get better at reading and understanding other people’s emotions. But while they are developing these skills, they can sometimes misread facial expressions or body language.

857253702685Adolescence is the period of life known for the formation of personal and social identity. Adolescents must explore, test limits, become autonomous, and commit to an identity, or sense of self.

The relationships adolescents have with their peers, family, and members of their social sphere play a vital role in their development. But it can be a time of increased conflict between parents and their children.

Erik Erikson referred to the task of the adolescent as one of identity versus role confusion. Thus, in Erikson’s view, an adolescent’s main questions are “Who am I?” and “Who do I want to be?”
As adolescents work to form their identities, they pull away from their parents, and the peer group becomes very important; despite this, relationships with parents still play a significant role in identity formation.

00Adolescence is the period of life known for the formation of personal and social identity. Adolescents must explore, test limits, become autonomous, and commit to an identity, or sense of self.

The relationships adolescents have with their peers, family, and members of their social sphere play a vital role in their development. But it can be a time of increased conflict between parents and their children.

Erik Erikson referred to the task of the adolescent as one of identity versus role confusion. Thus, in Erikson’s view, an adolescent’s main questions are “Who am I?” and “Who do I want to be?”
As adolescents work to form their identities, they pull away from their parents, and the peer group becomes very important; despite this, relationships with parents still play a significant role in identity formation.

355282535560It is also a time of cognitive change as the adolescent begins to think of new possibilities and to consider abstract concepts such as love, fear, and freedom. Ironically, adolescents have a sense of invincibility that puts them at greater risk of dying from accidents or contracting sexually transmitted infections that can have lifelong consequences.

Early in adolescence, cognitive developments result in greater self-awareness, the ability to think about abstract, future possibilities, and the ability to consider multiple possibilities and identities at once.

When adolescents have advanced cognitive development and maturity, they tend to resolve identity issues more easily than peers who are less cognitively developed.

0It is also a time of cognitive change as the adolescent begins to think of new possibilities and to consider abstract concepts such as love, fear, and freedom. Ironically, adolescents have a sense of invincibility that puts them at greater risk of dying from accidents or contracting sexually transmitted infections that can have lifelong consequences.

Early in adolescence, cognitive developments result in greater self-awareness, the ability to think about abstract, future possibilities, and the ability to consider multiple possibilities and identities at once.

When adolescents have advanced cognitive development and maturity, they tend to resolve identity issues more easily than peers who are less cognitively developed.