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Analysis of poem Do not go gentle into that good night This poem is about dying

Analysis of poem
Do not go gentle into that good night
This poem is about dying. It is an homage to all men who have lived their lives, no matter how they have done so. It ends with a son’s plea toward his father to “not go gentle into that good night” and to “Rage, rage against the dying of the light.” The choice of nouns throughout the poem alludes to the notion that life is inextricably intertwined with nature and space because life is: night, day, light, dark, bright, lightening, sun, and meteors. The poem is short but delivers a message that is very powerful and concise that speaks to all men. The length, contrasted with the intensity of the poem, are symbols of the perception of the passage of time from the last moments of life onward. When we die, this is when we look back on our lives and think of how quickly it all passed us by. Time is fleeting as they say and this poem captures that saying well. The poem also delivers, with humble reassurance, that death is not a bad thing but rather that “dark is right.” Although we must live our lives in a meaningful and powerful way, we must also accept that death will come to us too. Death, or as the author puts it “that good night”, can be easily interpreted as the last time that we will close our eyes and fall asleep never to awake.
The choice of words and syntax work in a way that strays from ordinary sentences and gives it much of its appeal. The author’s writing is creative and non-conventional. Without even understanding each line, one can still indulge in the imagery and stark contrasts. The discussion about the sense of sight is very powerful because thinking of “Blind eyes that could blaze like meteors” is a simile that is hard to conceptualize. This speaks more of what we can imagine rather than what we can see. The word “blaze” gives a sense of urgency to remember as much as we can before we die.